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 Discoveries by the telescopes on Mauna Kea
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2019 :  21:06:08  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you, dan_c, very interesting article!
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EightFingers
Punatic

USA
2767 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2019 :  22:10:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I’m going to remember all this next time I vote.

Puna: Our roosters crow first
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2019 :  22:43:44  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you, 8F.
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dan d
Punatic

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2019 :  13:03:56  Show Profile  Visit dan d's Homepage  Reply with Quote
And simce now there is no science to speak of being done

https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/planet-gj357-d-potentially-habitable-super-earth-discovered/

Only 31 lyears away


HPP
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dan d
Punatic

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2019 :  15:45:20  Show Profile  Visit dan d's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dan c, dan d, now we need a dan e or,b?


HPP
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/07/2019 :  20:22:47  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A news release from the Maunakea Observatories:

The East Asian Observatory Receives New Instrument: Namakanui
Namakanui will aide search for black holes


HILO, HI - In the midst of protests, the East Asian Observatory received delivery of its newest instrument, Namakanui. Named by renowned Hawaiian language expert Dr. Larry Kimura, Namakanui or "big-eyed fish" will allow astronomers to seek out the coldest gas and dust in the universe, opening a new window into the universe from Maunakea.

The instrument is comprised of three cameras, each studying the universe at a different wavelength or color of light. The three detectors all have their own species names, U'u (1.2mm detector), Aweoweo (0.8mm) and Ala'ihi (3.5mm). Dr. Kimura visited the East Asian Observatories' base facility in Hilo to see the instrument in person for the first time upon its arrival.

"We love the names Dr. Kimura chose -- how they describe the species of fish in Hawaiian waters that come out in the darkness of night to hunt with their large sensitive eyes, " says Dr. Jessica Dempsey, deputy director of the East Asian Observatory. "Namakanui will peer into the darkest and coldest regions of space to help astronomers hunt for objects we currently are unable to see."

When operational, the instrument will be cooled to just a few degrees above absolute zero, in order to be sensitive to faint radiation emitted from cold, star-forming gases such as carbon monoxide, and other complex molecules which coalesce in our galaxy and beyond.

The EAO team plans to use Namakanui next year for the next experiment with the Event Horizon Telescope as the world-wide collection of telescopes hunt for the next image of a black hole. EAO and its neighbor on the summit of Maunakea the Submillimeter Array participated in the last Event Horizon Telescope experiment, which lead to the immense achievement of imaging P#333;wehi, the black hole at the center of the massive M87 galaxy, announced earlier this year.

In the next hunt, Namakanui's detectors will bring 4 times more sensitive measurements to the experiment, giving us an even greater chance of imaging these mysterious monsters at the centers of our galaxy and beyond.

Namakanui arrived in Hilo three weeks ago, intended for delivery and installation at the summit immediately after. The ongoing protests and access challenges meant this was not possible. Instead, the creative staff at EAO and ASIAA cooled the instrument down in the EAO labs, to start testing and learning about the instrument. Namakanui is too sensitive to travel to the summit until access is possible by the main Maunakea Access Road. The challenge will remain in getting the instrument installed and commissioned in time for the Event Horizon Telescope tests later this year and early next year.
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HereOnThePrimalEdge
Punatic

South Sandwich Islands
8986 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2019 :  11:15:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After 30 years of work, the largest map of galaxies in the universe to date:

At the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy in Honolulu, the veteran cosmologist (Brent Tully) has been meticulously charting the large-scale structure of the universe. In July, after more than three decades of work, he and his collaborators released the latest fruits of this labor: the most complete view ever created of our place in space.

In these vivid 3D maps, which Tully call “Cosmicflows,” the universe takes on a startlingly new appearance.

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/master-plan-universe-revealed-new-galaxy-maps-ncna1040936

3D Map:
http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/info/press-releases/local_void/
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2019 :  20:45:57  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
"Critical observation made on Maunakea during first night of return to operations"

"The existing astronomical observatories on Maunakea returned to operations this weekend, and it didn’t take long for a significant result to be achieved, not only for science, but for assuring the safety of the Earth.

Observations of the near-Earth asteroid 2006 QV89 made on August 11 with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) have ruled out any potential future impact threat to the Earth by this asteroid for the next century.
"

http://manoa.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=10135
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2019 :  20:37:46  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
"Unpresidented" bright flashes from the Galaxy's black hole

Shortly before the MK observatories were forced to shut down, observations using the Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea showed bright flashes from the black hole at the center of the Galaxy. The cause of the flashes is not yet understood but is likely due to infalling matter as it approaches the Schwarzschild radius, the point where light can no longer escape from a black hole.

Article on CNN:

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/world/milky-way-black-hole-scn-trnd/index.html

And the video and some explanations available via twitter:

https://twitter.com/quantumpenguin/status/1160368687590727680

Note that the field of view of the video is one by one arcsecond. This roughly how large a star appears to the naked eye at a good seeing site. The resolution of the images is about 60-milliarcseconds, which is far better than any space telescope can deliver due to the use of adaptive optics at Keck.
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/15/2019 :  20:45:37  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A new type of supernova

A new breed of supernovae has been discovered with the use of the Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea. Depending on their mass, supernovae are massive stars that collapse in on themselves through gravity when they exhaust their fuel. The collapse causes a massive explosion leaving the core of the star behind, which is so compressed it turns into a neutron star or a black hole.

A recent supernova, SN 2016iet, is very different. The original star was supermassive, about 200 solar masses and lacked metals, i.e., atoms heavier than hydrogen and helium. When it ran out of fuel, the collapse was so intense that matter-antimatter particle pairs were created which led to a massive explosion when they recombined blowing the star to pieces and leaving no core behind.

https://www.gemini.edu/node/21217

"A renegade star exploding in a distant galaxy has forced astronomers to set aside decades of research and focus on a new breed of supernova that can utterly annihilate its parent star — leaving no remnant behind. The signature event, something astronomers had never witnessed before, may represent the way in which the most massive stars in the Universe, including the first stars, die."
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dan_c
Newbie

USA
36 Posts

Posted - 08/15/2019 :  21:03:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Tom. That's really cool. I thought that most stars with ten times the Sun's mass would become black holes.

Also, that is one huge "nuke".

It seems to me that there is a lot more variety in the research being done on Mauna Kea than one would expect -- and that the other telescopes besides the Kecks are more important than realized.
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/15/2019 :  21:35:31  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
dan_c - I think the limit is less for black-hole formation, three or four solar masses, but will double-check. Things change over time as we better understand the physics of the universe.

For instance, as a student I was taught the "Eddington Limit", i.e., stars couldn't be more massive than about 100 solar masses because they would be too unstable and basically blow themselves to bits before they settled down to become stars. Things have changed over the last couple of decades but there is still a limit. If I recall correctly, the Eddington limit was based on a star made of pure hydrogen which is not the case in reality. However, we have now observed a few stars that are more massive than this theory allows, so there are other factors in play.

Thanks for your interest!
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2019 :  00:13:59  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There's been a new gravitational wave event tonight - we're busy looking for the source.
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kander
Da Kine

USA
441 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2019 :  08:49:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is the gravitational data accessible by regular humans?
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TomK
Punatic

USA
8875 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2019 :  19:26:49  Show Profile  Visit TomK's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, there's the Gravitational-Wave Candidate Event Database, but am not sure you'll find their products particularly useful.

https://gracedb.ligo.org/superevents/S190814bv/
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